LAND OF LAST CHANCES

Middle-aged corporate women have it rough in fiction. We’re bitter, uncompromising, lonely, regretful—and always barren. Which is why it was so refreshing to read LAND OF LAST CHANCES by Joan Cohen. By introducing a real-life woman facing real-world choices, Cohen subverts these familiar stereotypes and offers a brand new narrative. Finally! A thinking, feeling woman we can all root for.

– Jillian Medoff, bestselling author of THIS COULD HURT

Joan Cohen’s remarkable first novel is impossible to put down. LAND OF LAST CHANCES is fiction, but the heroic actions of a business woman in her forties seem very real. While pregnant, she discovers a potential genetic predisposition to early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. The book takes you through the difficult decisions she has to make and educates you on our latest understanding of early-onset and late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. A must-read genetic thriller intertwined with high-level business decisions at her workplace, all happening in the Boston area, the world center of advanced medicine and biotechnology.

– Carmela R. Abraham, Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry, Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Boston University School of Medicine

“In this deeply moving and astutely observed novel, one woman’s harrowing confrontation with her family’s genetic history offers a wise and bracingly modern contemplation of an ancient question: does our history determine our future? A vital new entry into the burgeoning literature of Alzheimer’s fiction, Land of Last Chances is a wise, hopeful, and enormously gripping debut.”

– Stefan Merrill Block, bestselling author of The Story of Forgetting, The Storm at the Door, and Oliver Loving

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